The Hittite Series — Post by Michael J. Findley

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The book of Genesis, post-flood to the death of Joseph, is the ice age. Michael Oard has done extensive work demonstrating that there was a single ice age immediately after the flood lasting about seven hundred years. For an introduction to this concept, the book Frozen In Time is available without charge as a series of .pdf documents on the answersingenesis.com website.

We wrote detailed, documented works on the establishment of religion, secular humanism, science, the results of secular humanism as an establishment of religion, creation, the origin of evil, the flood and the ice age. Critics complained that is was too long, too difficult to read, too many sources. So I removed all of the documentation, repetition, and restatement for clarity. No explanations for unusual words, nothing but basic assertions. This book is only about sixty pages and is called Disestablish.

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To some critics, it is still too difficult to read. So I wrote a series of novels about the Hittites. The first book begins just after the fall of the tower of Babel, and the Hittites cannot comprehend a foreign language. Abraham is a friend of Ephron. Sarah and Hagar are friends of Shelometh. Biblical events are woven into the story line.

The series shows a population explosion, rapid advances in technology, knowledge of world wide events, the ability to travel great distances, wars, the introduction of idolatry, the consequences of idolatry, and long life spans.

It describes tools, food, eating habits, clothing, travel, domestic animals, marriage customs, jewelery, slavery, trade, relationships between cities and cultures, money, hunting, and sailing.

One of the characters talks about his visit to Noah. Death is rare in the first three books. Death is part of warfare in the fourth book, but otherwise uncommon. Death is common in the fifth book, with most of the characters introduced in the first three books dying. Children are born to parents in the fifth book who were born in the fourth book.

There are complex relationships between brothers and sisters and empires. Slaves are as important as royalty. Kings make mistakes. Slaves save empires. Most of the characters are neither royalty nor slaves.

The setting is primarily Hattusha and Hebron. However, it ranges from the first cataract of the Nile, to Troy, to the Black Sea to the Tigris River, to Damascus. Building by stone is detailed, Life an a Phoenician ship is described, but most of the time they live either in a city or a tent.

The standard method of transportation was walking, though riding a camel or a horse was common. During the course of these stories, the wagon and chariot are invented, improved and used in warfare. Ships were common. Writing predates this series. However, at the beginning, writing was very difficult and almost unknown. By the end of the fifth book, reading is common, almost universal.

But the primary purpose was to make the stories interesting. Because, if no one reads them, they do not teach.

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Decisions, Termites, and the Meaning of Words — Post by Michael J. Findley

House destroyed by termites

             House destroyed by termites

“Words have no meaning.” Scalia’s dissenting opinion marks the end of the American dream. It is the triumph of might makes right, also known as the tyranny of the majority (of those in power).

The struggle of good versus evil goes back to the shining one in the garden. The angel of light who walked in the garden god has deceived since the garden of Eden.

In America, at least in the theory of law, words used to have meaning. FDR was enraged that he could not corrupt the courts. Thomas Jefferson was enraged that the courts were corrupt.

But the standards of right and wrong, good verses evil, are not an issue of the courts, law, politics, legislation, or any man-made institution.

God is Good. And any departure from God is evil. Some forms of evil have greater and more far-reaching consequences than others. Stealing a dollar from a wealthy neighbor is still stealing. But the theft of millions of dollars by a greedy government has far greater consequences.

Murdering millions is worse than murdering one person. But even in the case of one person it is still murder.

The rejection of truth because truth does not allow you to commit the sin you want to commit is the evil we all commit. It is the termite of not accepting words for what they mean which destroys any family, society and government.

The return of meaning to words will not begin with the Supreme Court, the White House, or Congress. It must begin with you and me, the individual. The individual builds honesty into the family. The family reinforces the honesty of accepting words for what they mean and builds up the churches. That acceptance of words for what they mean then builds the local, then the state, then the federal governments. It is a series of decisions we make every day, to accept words for what they mean — to accept good and reject evil.

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Premade Cover Sale! — Guest post by Jen Gentry

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Some of the most talented cover designers I have the privilege to know have come together for a great cause. They have donated several glorious pre-made book covers to help create scholarship money to assist aspiring indie authors to attend the upcoming Christian Indie Authors Conference. This is an excellent opportunity for Indie Authors to score a professional book cover at a very good cost and help a fellow Indie Author at the same time.


The sale is going on right now and ends on July 4th. The organizer Samantha Fury says they will be adding new covers daily until the sale is over.


I personally have enjoyed just looking through the wonderful selection of interesting, breathtaking, and artistic works on display. Anyone who purchases will be working directly with the designer to personalize each piece.


If you are looking for a cover for your own next masterpiece be sure to check out this book cover extravaganza.  Here is the link for the facebook event. https://www.facebook.com/groups/1594999634107302/

To learn more about the #CIAN2015 Conference please visit their website here
www.christianindieauthors.com/cia-conference.html

Original post from: http://jengentrysbooks.weebly.com/gems-from-jen/book-covers-supporting-a-good-cause-for-indie-authors

site.  https://www.facebook.com/groups/1594999634107302/

To learn more about the #CIAN2015 Conference please visit their website here
www.christianindieauthors.com/cia-conference.html

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Guest Post: Plethora of Player blog tour Week One: Shawn Lamb introduces Captain Kell

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Hello. This week we are in the kingdom of Allon for a series of interviews with those portrayed in Shawn Lamb’s new YA fantasy “The Great Battle”, book 1 of The Guardians of Allon trilogy.

Our first guest is Captain Kell. Thank you for coming, Captain. Tell us a little about yourself.

Well, as Jor’el’s first created being, I took on physical form a little over 2,000 years ago. Jor’el is the Almighty Creator. My primary function is captain of the Guardians.

Two thousand years? How long do Guardians live?

Our spirits are immortal. We take on physical from to facilitate our function in protecting the kingdom of Allon, along with providing guidance and wisdom for the mortals.

Must be interesting for an immortal being to interact with mortals.

Ay, (chuckling) they are peculiar at times, but overall they are pleasant to deal with. I know Avatar finds amusement when interacting with them.

Avatar?

Lieutenant Avatar is my aide. Armus is my second-in-command. Together we form the High Trio overseeing all Guardians. Trios are used to help govern each of the twelve provinces of Allon. Under the three Guardians assigned to the Trio are other Guardians, who help in whatever form is necessary such as a militia for defense or advisors for agriculture.

I assume by your appearance with breastplate and sword that you lead the defense.

I do. I’m of the warrior caste. Guardians serve in various roles. For example, Vidar is the première archer while Hunter is a ranger, one who protects the forest. There are also scholars, vassals and other castes depending upon the tasks needed.

When you learned about this rogue Guardian, how did it affect your relationship with mortals? It’s rumored this Guardian has abused some of them.

Alas, it is no rumor. I’ve witnessed the aftermath. Although it is hard to believe that one created to protect could inflict such abuse. I’m determined to find the one responsible and put an end to it!

I must say, Captain, the look in your golden eyes makes me certain you will do as you say. Are all Guardians’ eyes so intense?

Our eyes were made to be a striking difference compared to mortals. We have the ability to invoke our heavenly senses. So what you see in my eyes is a certainty. The rogue will be dealt with.

What about Dagar? I’ve heard the rogue maybe connected with him. But isn’t he the Guardian assigned to protect Jor’el’s holy throne?

Ay, that is why he was created. Let’s just say Dagar is acting rather uncharacteristic of late. Whether that connection to the rogue is accurate, is what I’m trying to determine.

You sound like you don’t want to believe Dagar is involved.

I don’t. Dagar is my peer, as trusted by Jor’el as me. I consider him a friend thus his behavior and growing animosity towards mortals and his own kind is personally very disturbing. My hope is to convince him to lay aside his trouble and return to duty.

What if you can’t convince Dagar? If he joins this rogue, will you stop him?

Ay! Jor’el help the mortals should war between the Guardians happen. It will leave the kingdom reeling. But I for one would rather go down in battle defending those in my charge than dishonor the Almighty and abandon the mortals. Now I must go. I have called a meeting of the Trio Leaders in hopes of convincing Dagar to change his course.

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The Great Battle – Book 1 – Guardians of Allon is currently available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle.
Paperback: http://www.amazon.com/Great-Battle-Guardians-Allon/dp/098910298X

Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/Great-Battle-Guardians-Allon-Book-ebook/dp/B00ZJXXRIK

Shawn Lamb is an award-winning author of the YA epic series Allon and children’s trilogy “The King’s Children”. To learn more about Shawn and her books visit www.allonbooks.com

Please keep touring or you’ll miss out on the Plethora of Characters we have in store for you this summer!

Also join us on the fb event page here! https://www.facebook.com/events/484708925025501/

Four authors have joined in this tour: Mary C. Findley, Shawn Lamb, Pamela Funke, and Caryl MacAdoo.

Four authors — twelve characters — one whirlwind tour!

Here’s the tour in a nutshell (or a plethora of nutshells)

Our authors:

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Shawn Lamb http://allonbooksblog.net/

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Caryl McAdoo http://carylmcadoo.blogspot.com/

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Pamela Funke http://authorpamfunke.blogspot.com/

sophronia pic alone

Mary C. Findley https://elkjerkyforthesoul.wordpress.com

The Schedule

Shawn Lamb — On Elk Jerky For the Soul June 22 – On Pamela Funke’s Wed June 24th – On Caryl MacAdoo’s Friday, June 26.

Mary C. Findley — on Caryl’s Monday July 6 – on Shawn’s Wed 8th – on Pam’s Fri 10th

Caryl – on Shawn’s Mon July 13th – on Elk Jerky Wed July 15th on Pam’s – Friday 17th.

Pam – on Shawn’s Monday July 20 – on Caryl Wed July 22 On Elk Jerky’s – Fri July 24.

Authors may award prizes at their discretion, and we are working up a grand prize package for faithful followers throughout the blog tour!

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Christian Indie Authors Network Writers’ Conference — Shared from Jen Gentry

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I am very excited to talk about the upcoming Christian Indie Authors Conference 2015, July 30 to August 2, 2015 in Davenport, Iowa at the Radisson River Front Inn. This conference is all about the self-published author and it is a groundbreaking event. There are many helpful sessions to choose from ranging from self-publishing 101, taught by keynote speaker bestselling author Darlene Shortridge, owner of 40 Day Publishing, to many selections on formatting, designing book covers, plus the hottest new marketing trends. Also, there are some special guest speakers teaching on how to improve your writing skills and what to look for when editing. The awards banquet promises to be a gala event where the winners of the CIAN Book of the Year awards will be presented. If you are a savvy self-published author or just starting to learn about how to be a self-publishing author I encourage you to check out this upcoming conference. To find out more about the #CIAN2015 Conference go to http://www.christianindieauthors.com/cia-conference.html

Visit Jen Gentry’s Books here:

http://jengentrysbooks.weebly.com/

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Going Off the Grid– Would You? Could You? Should You? — Post by Mary C. Findley

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Recently I have been giving a lot of thought to the idea of being off the grid. First, as I understand it, people believe less contact with the outside world and less technology will mean one or all of the following: less stress. less government interference, more safety, and/or more spirituality.  Sometimes there are religious reasons, not necessarily Christian. Sometimes there’s a fear of some type of world-scorching event (Zombie apocalypse, anyone?) or a police state takeover. Sometimes it’s just a desire for simplicity and bringing your fragmented family, friends, or church back together.

Many Sundays we stop in at a Truckstop Chapel. We bring our Kindle and tablet as Bibles, and sometimes even our laptops. We get some strange or merely uncomprehending looks. Many traditional Christians have computers but they use them like typewriters. Sometimes they send emails. (I might note that I put our email on every chapel visitor card we have gone to but have never, ever had anyone respond, nor do they have a way to contact them online that ever gets a response. Call us, they say.)

So many believers still use print Bibles and hand out paper study materials and spend very little productive ministry time online. If we get as far as telling people we have a blog and talk to a lot of people online about our books and about spiritual issues, that blank look comes back.

They know about websites. They know about blogs. Sometimes they might look up something bible-study related. But when it comes to everyday interaction and use of technology for studying and sharing, they just don’t do it. I thought maybe it was a generational thing — we are a little unusual for being in our late fifties and active online. But many people our age are comfortable online and with digital devices. And many young truckstop preachers still have no concept of going digital. They’re already off the grid, I guess, but should they be?

So I have to ask … What is it that makes some Christians already in ministries ignorant about technology and digital opportunities to minister? Why do they barely understand what a Kindle or a tablet is? Why do so many good people still say things like “What do you do on there? Look at pictures? Play games? Are you messaging each other with your two laptops there?” And when we respond that we write books and have a blog and get into spiritual discussions online, that blank look comes back.

Many people are active online with a cause like the ones I listed at the beginning of this post. You’d think they’d be offline, off the grid, afraid of the government or the distractions or whatever … but they consider online communication important enough to risk staying on the grid. Some of these people have great, needed messages. Some of them are crazy, unimportant, or heretics.

So maybe it’s Bible believers who need to step up their game and understand that they might have dwindling church attendance or few truck drivers visiting their chapels because they appear so limited in knowledge and message. Yes, you can get online and get caught up in more heresies and cults and crazy wrong ideas. You can also waste time looking at cat pictures and pithy sayings.

We don’t want to be monks or hermits or have cultic compounds. We want to go where the people are. We want to reach out and touch lives. So we pound the pavement, or staff the chapel, or outreach center, or whatever we do to physically connect with people and invite them in. But they blow us off.  They don’t come.

I don’t know why. But I know I’m going to go online, where some of them are, and write books that are available in digital format, and meanwhile, try to stay on the grid and keep the lines of communication open. I want to “Speak a word in season” in a digital world.

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Can You Change? Will You Change? — Post by Mary C. Findley

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We love books. But we live in a semi truck. Yes. We live there, full-time, hubby and I. It’s not one of those with a motor home setup. It has small storage spaces here and there, but we have to have clothes, food, tools, personal care supplies ,,, Not a lot of room for books. We have perhaps a dozen books, if that many, in the truck, and they fill an entire cupboard. They are reference books that only exist in print, or samples of some of the books we have written in print format.

We also have a Kindle Keyboard, a Kindle Fire, and a tablet. Among all three, we may have 2000 books. Not sure. But it’s probable that we have more than you do in your whole house.

Do you read ebooks? More and more people say they do. It’s still kind of like a novelty, reading ebooks as opposed to print books. Some get them on their phones, their tablets, or even own an ereader especially for books. Some claim they buy a lot of books there, or take advantage of the free ones that are EVERYWHERE online. You can certainly save a ton of money, in most cases, by buying ebooks versus print books.

But many people still prefer “real” books. They want to hold them in their hands, and they have bookshelves filled with them. Why not? Books are nice. Hardcover books are substantial, and last a long time. They can even become valuable. For thousands of years, people have valued physical reading material, be it clay tablets, scrolls, parchment, or paper books. They are treasures, and can be ornaments to a home. Beautiful scroll cases. Ornate bookshelves.

But what happens when you no longer have a home? You say that won’t happen? It has happened to many people, for many reasons. I’m just going to focus on just two reasons, though. I’m not necessarily talking about homelessness. That’s a different issue, for another time.

One reason for not having a home is the need to be mobile, like our current need. Our work requires constant travel. Go where a load is, pick it up, go where it needs to deliver. We have some stuff in storage, but that’s mostly more books, which are kind of becoming a burden, because storage has to be cared for and paid for.

Another reason for travel is to make personal appearances. Many sales jobs require that. Public speakers of all kinds have to do that. We are trying to segue into that, to be teachers and to promote our books by making appearances at conferences and conventions. Go where the people are, to tell them about what you want them to buy from you. But even people who do that usually have a home base — a place they keep coming back to. Normally that’s a home, with books and bookshelves.And they sell physical books at these appearances.

But there’s a third reason for constant travel. It’s called persecution. People have suffered that for thousands of years, too. Elijah in the Scriptures is an excellent example. Where did he come from? Where did he live? We have no idea. But we know of two incidences in his short career where he had to pick up and move out, fast. He predicted no rain for around three years and then God told him to run and hide. After the drought ended with that spectacular sacrifice on Carmel, he ran again. Pretty sure he didn’t take his book collection with him. Maybe, you’ll say, he didn’t have to make that second move. He just did it because he was scared. He still did it, fast, and likely didn’t take a lot of baggage.

The point is that we as believers are too rooted in our homes and our stuff. What if we had to move, suddenly? What would happen to our books? How would we study, learn, teach, and even amuse or distract ourselves and those we care about? Don’t give me the excuse that earlier believers didn’t have electronic devices. We do, but we’re relegating them to the toy department. It’s time to realize they are tools God has given us.

Apocalyptic stories drill home the mantra that we will be at a mere survival level. We will trudge, and kill the enemy, whatever it is, and trudge some more, and scrounge for food, and hide, and become hardened and tough, and nothing else will matter, until we reach that refuge, however elusive it is. One day we will get home again, and start accumulating stuff again.

But what about the people in the Scriptures who wandered in sheepskins and goatskins? What if we never have a regular home again? What will we do for books then? How will we teach our children?

I haven’t seen the movie The Book of Eli, but I understand that Eli listened to recordings for most of the movie as he traveled. That’s one way to “read,” and necessary for him. It sounds like a great idea that he had to barter for power sources to recharge his listening device. A nifty, practical concern.

Still, the movie, to me, seems to have had a rather silly point — fighting and struggling and killing and nearly dying to possess or preserve a physical book. When are we going to realize that digital books can live forever, go anywhere, come to us easily, instantly? They take up almost no physical space. They can have beautiful, color illustrations. They can have sounds, even be listened to rather than just read. These things are treasures in the aether. They can flee persecution with us, in our pocket or our backpack.

Christ said to the disciples to go to the ends of the world, sharing the Good News. But we won’t go, because we won’t leave our stuff, and some of that stuff is physical books. Print Bibles, concordances, study guides, devotionals. Homeschoolers even have tons of paper to teach their children, with the best of intentions. Maybe the disciples wouldn’t leave their stuff, either, and that’s why persecution came. When it did, they went everywhere, preaching.

Most of us still haven’t got the message that anyone can go and tell the Good News, because we’re stuck to our stuff. We can’t even answer a question out on the street without going home and looking it up in our paper Bible. What if your Bible was right with you, in your phone? What if, instead of your kid using his handheld device to play games or check Instagram, he had his Bible, his schoolbooks, wondrous, edifying pleasure reading, right there in his hands?

When there’s a fire or a tornado or some other disaster, we have to pick up and move fast. What do people grab first? Their phones. Sometimes nothing else.

When we are persecuted (and we will be) we will have to move fast and travel light. Many people already are fleeing death for their faith. What will you be able to take? Not those bookshelves of Bibles and homeschool curriculum and reference books. Probably not any of your physical books. But what if your tablet or phone is also your book shelf? What treasures can you take, and preserve, and share?

Just think about it.

Images from Pixabay.com

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