Tag Archives: ebooks

Pronoun, Smashwords, and Draft 2 Digital — The “Other” ebook sales sites

where to sell your ebooks

Many authors have uploaded their ebooks onto Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publishing site to reach readers. Amazon is a great place, and some authors even choose to be exclusive there, in the Kindle Unlimited program, through KDP Select. However, if you choose to distribute your books widely, here are three options for getting them into many sales avenues at once. Each one has a slightly different distribution range, and the requirements and procedures vary somewhat too, so here we go.

Pronoun is the site I most recently began to work with. It is one of few (or maybe no others do yet) that distributes to Amazon. It also gets you into Apple iBooks, B&N, Kobo, and Google Play, as well as library distributors Overdrive and Bibliotheca. It does not allow you to use their distribution for sites your books already appears on (unlike Smashwords and D2D) so I am just using it for Google Play, Overdrive, and Bibliotheca. The last two are means of getting your books into libraries, so that is a good thing. I was a little conflicted about Google Play, since I have heard Google doesn’t always respect author copyrights, but since I just began putting our books there in June and already have three sales, I am hoping it is worth the risk.

Here is the link to the Pronoun site https://books.pronoun.com. Take a look at the author agreement, which seems very simple and straightforward. If you allow Pronoun to post your titles that are already for sale on Amazon, it will send you rankings and other information that you may find useful. It will email you when you get sales or let you know about any distribution problems you may encounter. When you are choosing the categories and keywords it makes suggestions and gives rankings for past use in searches, so you know better, perhaps, if you have chosen good ones.

An image inside a file can’t be over a certain total pixel count, so don’t put your full size cover into the file, and you must have a TOC in the front, linked or not, and a working ebook NCX (the digital table of contents that automatically displays in an ebook reader), even if your chapters aren’t named, and even if it’s a short story. Yes, if you have just Chapter One, Chapter Two, etc., you still have to list them in the front. I make my own epubs to upload, and if you do that, be sure the title in that metadata file matches your book title.

It is my understanding that they take less revenue than some other sites. They take you through everything step by step and the process is pretty easy. If you are just starting to publish this may be a good site, since it does get you on Amazon along with other well-known retailers, and potentially into libraries.

Draft 2 Digital is a very easy site to upload to, and distributes to

  • iBooks
  • Barnes & Noble
  • Kobo (including Kobo Plus)
  • Inktera (formally Page Foundry)
  • Scribd
  • 24Symbols
  • Tolino
  • Playster

There is no style guide or special requirements. You can just upload a Word document and they say it will become a beautifully formatted ebook. I have not done it this way, but may authors are happy with their results and love how easy it is. You can also get a book formatted for print in PDF format from this site. Here is the link to the site: https://www.draft2digital.com. It does not matter if you already have your books on sites they distribute to. They don’t demand exclusivity.

Smashwords is a more difficult site to upload books to. You can give them Word docs but they have strict requirements for formatting and if you don’t follow them the book will be rejected. Many authors have given up trying to submit to them. I persevered and got our books on there. They do have file size limits — 10 megs for a Word doc and 20 for an epub. Here is a post I wrote simplifying formatting requirements for your book.

https://elkjerkyforthesoul.wordpress.com/2014/05/10/smashwords-formatting-its-not-no-sweat-but-its-also-can-do/

It’s a little harder to pin down where your books are actually distributed by Smashwords, since they list sites they don’t yet distribute to, even on the author dashboard for tracking sales. Some I am fairly sure about are Baker & Taylor’s Blio.com, Library Direct, Apple, Barnes & Noble, Scribd, Kobo, /Inkterra, and txtr. Tracking your sales is much more difficult, also.

Both D2D and Smashwords recently changed their policies so they now pay each month instead of quarterly, no matter the balance owed. Pronoun also pays through Paypal. That goes into the Paypal account you set up with them.

 

 

 

 

 

2 Comments

Filed under Publishing, Writing, Writing, Reviewing, Publishing, and about Blogging

The Basics of EBook Cover Design — post by Mary C. Findley

talisman cover

(Pictured above is one example of an ebook cover I made as a sample of my work. It incorporates many of the elements covered in this post. Can you spot the layering, use of vectors, and making the font complement the genre-specifics of the cover?)

This post may get a little involved and technical, but I hope it will help struggling authors who are trying to make their own ebook covers. I posted about print book covers in the previous post, and you can refer to that too. This post will help you even if you are making a print cover first, from scratch. Some authors pay a designer to make the ebook version and then create the print book cover themselves. Either way you do it, these two posts together will hopefully give you some help.

I will say that there are many photo manipulation programs, from costly to free in price and from relatively simple to difficult in use. I won’t say any are easy, and I will say that there can be a big learning curve because of all the features and variations some programs have. The different interfaces can be easier or harder to cope with.

I use PhotoImpact, formerly made by Ulead, now sold by Corel, and have for many years. It is comparatively inexpensive and can be purchased here: http://www.paintshoppro.com/en/products/photoimpact/  I had a Photoshop Lite version before that, and I think the features are in many ways similar. Both are feature-rich, meaning they have many tools and many options for designing, tweaking, and creating. I also know that even experienced professional designers mostly only use a fraction of the features a program has available. Familiar tools that do the job become old friends. Trying new things can be time-consuming and difficult. The last thing a designer wants to do is spend tons of time on a single cover, particularly if he is also a writer responsible for producing the story that fits that cover.

I don’t know what program people will choose to use so I am going to try to make my references to tools, menus, etc., within the program as generic as I can. As I said, my reference is PhotoImpact so bear with me if not everything specifically applies to, or is easy to find an equivalent of, in your program. My purpose is not to teach photo manipulation. That takes a long time to learn to do well. I just hope to be able to make it possible for some people to expand their do-it-your-selfer skills.

Determine the size of your final book. We make ours 5.5 x 8.5, a standard size for paperback books. Many people prefer 6 x 9. If you say, this will only be an ebook, why does it matter what size it is? I reply that you may wind up making a paperback someday. Formatting your manuscript for a print size is not a waste of time. There are details of print formatting that don’t apply to ebooks but if you set your ebook up with appropriate margins, page breaks, and proper beginning and ending chapter formatting you will have an easier time if you later want to make a print book. It will also look more professional to readers who grew up with “real” books.

russell asv bible system

This is a 5.5 x 8.5 cover, or, 1650 x 2550. If it is not showing full size in the post you should be able to click on this or any other image to get a full-size version. The image at the top of the post is a 6 x 9 or 1800 x 2700

If your cover is for a 5.5 x 8.5 book, create a blank file that is 1650 x 2550 pixels, 300 DPI. If it is 6 x 9, make it 1800 x 2700. Always make the image resolution 300 DPI. That’s a required resolution for print. Again, think of the future, and the possibility that it might be used for print someday. 72 DPI is all you need for screen resolution, and it will make a smaller file size, but your image will appear clearer and sharper, even in smaller sizes, if it’s 300 DPI, and therefore be more attractive to potential readers. What is DPI, you ask? It means dots per inch and refers, simply put, to the level of realistic detail in an image, which in digital form is just a bunch of dots, or pixels. The more pixels crammed into an inch of space in an image, the clearer and sharper and better it looks.

The image size is in part determined by the requirements of the ebook upload sites. Last time I checked, iTunes, or, in this case, iBooks, sets the standard for minimum dimensions of a book cover. It doesn’t have to be either of the sizes I suggested above, but it has to be at least 1400 on the smallest size and 2500 on the longest size. Dimensions are typically given with the width first and the height second. (1400 x 2500, in this case) And they are given in pixels, not in inches. The dimensions I gave above are larger than those minimums, which will keep you in good shape on major ebook retailers for upload.

[Now for the bad news. PhotoImpact was designed many years ago and seems to have become an orphan as far as updates are concerned. There have been a few but it is a bit slow and clunky with these large file sizes, especially when doing the much larger print layouts. You will have to be patient through the slow wait times for it to catch up with your process, especially if you place a large amount of text and then try to change and move it around.]

You now have a blank image of the correct size and resolution. Time to fill it with a wonderful book cover. First you must determine the genre of your book. The most important thing a cover does is attract readers. But it must attract the readers that really want the book you wrote. If you put a kissy-face couple on there, or a rose and a string of pearls, or a heart, or anything that looks romantic, it had better be a romance. If you put a sailing ship on a stormy sea with a crew struggling to keep from wrecking, it had better be some type of historical adventure. I can’t tell you the exact cover that’s right for your book. I can say it needs to send a clear signal about the subject, immediately, to people who might see it 1/16th of full size (or smaller) for one second. It must at least say STOP AND LOOK CLOSER! before the potential reader just says “Meh …” and moves on. I can give detailed instructions all day long about how to put an attractive cover together but I cannot make the point too strongly that you have got to nail your genre or few people will give it a glance. Genre is a category or subject into which your book fits. Maybe you will say, “My book is nonfiction. That’s not a clear genre.” But it still has a subject. Bible Study. Cooking. Home Repairs. Overcoming Depression. Whatever it is, keep looking until you find the perfect image that stands up and screams, “THIS BOOK IS ABOUT WHAT YOU WANT TO READ ABOUT!”

philip two struck imagea

Try to guess the genre of this cover in the comments below.

So you may ask, “Where do I look for images?” That depends in part on what you want to pay. There are stock photo sites that charge a lot of money for what are sometimes excellent images. Two examples are iStock and Getty. You can pay $20 or more just for one image. Some sites charge $5 or at least under $10 per image. CanStock is a good one, and so is Fotolia. There are many others, and, if you plan to make a number of covers, you can get a subscription or a package, paying so much for a certain number of images at discounted prices versus single images. You may not want to pay for images. That is your choice. Many photographers and even “photoshoppers” offer free images on sites like Pixabay. That is one of my favorite free image sites. But remember the quality of images, especially free ones, varies considerably. You will probably have to look at hundreds before you find an excellent one, paid or free. In the next section I’ll give some suggestions on why you want to keep looking.

Depositphotos_76032491_original  winter-1145732

(First imageis from Depositphotos. Second is Public Domain from Pixabay.)

Why use a paid versus free image? It depends on what you need, want, and can afford. The first image above is a free one. It’s very nice as pictures of horses go, but the second on, which is paid, shows the exact two horses I needed as a promo for two young adult historical books I had written. That’s why I paid for it, to get just what I wanted, and also because of the surrounding finishing touches — the lighting and cloudy shapes. I also have been able to twice purchase a highly-discounted image pack from Depositphotos. Look hard for deals if you want a lot of great images.

You need an image, whatever it is, to have certain qualities. These include clarity, simplicity, lighting, and composition. There are other things, but these are the basics. If you are tempted to use a homegrown images, such as your son’s picture of your dog, it had better be professional quality in size and resolution. Don’t use grainy or blurry or too small pictures unless you are going for a specific artistic effect and can truly pull it off and convince people you didn’t just thoughtlessly put a crummy picture on your book cover. The same goes for handmade art. If your cover needs refrigerator art, okay, but don’t use unprofessional art just because it has some personal significance to you. It has to attract readers. Use the largest size you can get. Stretching it often makes it distorted.

I am more and more convinced that all book covers attract more readers if they make proper use of light. Thomas Kinkade attracted millions by being the “painter of light.” Find a way to incorporate light into your cover. Find an image that has excellent light to start with and you don’t have to manipulate anything. Even if it’s a creepy thriller, incorporate a haunting, eerie light. If it’s inspirational, use a candle or oil lamp or glow of sunlight or moonlight. Light attracts attention. Find a way to use that to your advantage. Learn the different light-enhancing techniques of your program. Don’t just stick in a spotlight or bolt of lightning. The idea is to make it glow invitingly.

  delicate and fragile 25 phoenix 25 gothic unwilling 25

Examples of the use of lighting to get your cover some attention, no matter the genre.

A note about using a single image as your cover: I discourage it for several reasons. Some stock sites include in their very lengthy and complicated terms that you should not re-use a complete single image in something you mean to sell. Some specify that you must substantially change an image to avoid copyright issues. Even if you “buy” an image from a stock site, you don’t really own it. There are restrictions on how you use it and how many times you can reproduce it and all sorts of limits. You are responsible to use that image in a responsible manner. It contains digital information that is kind of like a GPS. They can find and track it. So, what you need to do is follow their terms of use, and, also, incorporate two or three images in a cover to be on the safe side.

People, animals, genre-specific objects, and backgrounds are the usual image components of a cover. I don’t recommend putting more than about three images together into a cover. It becomes cluttered and you lose control of the ability to make them all appear to blend and belong.

     teen sleuths 25 dystopian end times disaster 25 historical chekov 25

Examples of using people on covers. The first includes a “free” image. use such images with caution. The second includes silhouettes, which can be free and there is no need to worry about model releases because no one is recognizable. You can also use free images that show the back or lower parts of individuals. Anything that does not show a face is fair game if the image itself is pubic domain. The third cover is a composite of two paintings. These are great options for historicals, and allows for including people without incurring the need for model releases. As long as the painting is more than 100 years old, and the photographer just took an unaltered image of it, his photo can’t be copyrighted and the image is public domain.

A few special notes about including people on a cover. Even if you use images labeled “Public Domain,” if they include people, you should try to ensure that there is a model release. That means the person or persons gave permission for commercial use. If there isn’t one, you could be sued by that person. Some images are labeled “editorial use only.” That means you can use them on a blog or for educational purposes but you can’t use such images on something you mean to sell. Some models also specify that they don’t want their images used in any way that they or other people might object to. That can be a broad objection that’s hard to answer, say, if they object to the image on a Christian book cover because they are atheists. It’s up to the cover artist to walk the fine line of compliance when using people. Rules are even stricter for copyrighted images, logos, or things that are very famous. Be careful about images you use. Get permission, when in doubt.

If you choose to make a cover with no people, you can make a very striking cover just out of text, which I’ll deal with momentarily. You can use inanimate objects like fruit, weathered wood, or seashells. Doing this makes clarity, lighting, and simplicity all the more critical. You can use animals, landscapes, or interesting room settings. The possibilities are almost endless. Just choose the best of the best and remember the keys of clarity, simplicity, and lighting.

 sherry chamblee flaire 25 funny little love drops 25 tea time troubles 25

Some examples of covers with no people. Can you guess the genres in the comments?

Don’t crowd or clutter the cover with all the elements or subjects in your book, unless your book is about crowding and clutter. One author wanted me to put a host of characters from his book on the cover. At least seven, I think. Can you imagine how impractical that would be? If it’s an ensemble cast, you still should focus on the leader, or maybe the two or three most important characters. Remember the first impression people get of the cover is probably going to be tiny on a search page. If a reader sees nothing but blobs of color he may not stop to figure out what it is. I’m going to expose myself to some extent here, and show you a very early cover I made for my first Benny and the Bank Robber book (the most recent version is pictured below the next section of text.) This is an example of how NOT to do a cover more than anything.

254717_1808425104563_6589645_n

Quickly going through some of the no-nos I have learned since doing this cover: “Floating heads” are mostly bad. I have a whopping FIVE of them, which makes it five times as bad. I painted a fake hat on one character and boy does it look fake. The Bible and the cougar (oops — SIX floating heads) makes seven images, plus the forest background … and the attempt at painting texture looks … amateurish. The only good thing about it is that the text is fairly readable. Don’t let this happen to you.

So, whatever elements you have chosen, it’s time to see if they work together on your cover. This is called compositing. Each object you add to a cover goes on its own layer. You can move them up and down the “stack” and around on the “page” at will with tools like “send backward” or “bring to front” or “center horizontally.” You can also resize, flip, or rotate. (Just watch out for any lettering, such as on a T-shirt) that might end up displaying backwards.)

This is not an art or design course, so I can’t go into a lot more dos and don’ts. But here are a few. Do match up shadows and lighting. Imagine where the main light source is in the composition and make sure all the elements fit with that lighting. If they don’t, find something that does. There are people irritated enough by shadows falling the wrong way to reject your book. However great the story is, you’ve got to convince them to pick it up. Your cover’s got to impress them, not make them say, “Hey, the guy has a shadow on the left side of his face but the girl’s is on the right. that looks weird.” or “That woman is so faded she looks like a ghost next to that bright, colorful guy.” Somehow you have to make the elements match. This is where learning to use your brightness and contrast settings can help. Play with them and if you can’t get them right, consider another image. Match quality, intensity, light and shadow, and everything you can.

Use the tools you have, such as erasers, faders, feathering, and other types of edge-softeners, to get rid of unwanted backgrounds in the images you put together. Be especially careful with hair and spaces between fingers, elbows and waists, and other spots that could stand out and make the final image look amateurish. Match the edges of the images to the background if at all possible — dark on dark, light on light.

Watch tutorials on techniques. Strive to improve. Magnify until you can see tiny details. Add shadows and directional lighting if you can. Play with the direction objects are facing and something might just click into place in your mind to improve the overall look. My best advice when it comes to placing objects for a cover is that you may not be able to realistically match, say, people to a scenery background, without some tricks. You’ve no doubt seen people that look pasted onto a background. You might not be sure what’s wrong, but it’s just clear they don’t belong in that scene. Sometimes a light mist or smoke or fog can really help blend a scene.

  i just don't see it good bad angel painted benny ebook 3 12 2017

Do the elements “match” among these images? Why or why not?

The three images above represent different phases of my cover design career. The first, entitled “I Just Don’t See It,” was made quite a few years ago and includes so-called “free” people images. In fact, the man has two different images composited. His head did not come with his body. That’s why I included it, to see if I hid it well enough. I probably wouldn’t use it at this phase of my career, both due to the permission issues with the people, and the fact that I am not convinced my compositing skills are that good. The middle image is an attempt at a “painted” fantasy cover requested by an author friend. He didn’t think it was what he wanted but I did sell it to another author who thought it was perfect for her. I composited a whole bunch of photographic components in this image, especially on the demon figure. Again, it was made a few years ago, and my skills and image choices have improved, I think, since then, so I would do it differently now. Still, I was pleased with the results of my experiments on the whole. The third image was made very recently and consists of three images — the sunlit forest background. the boy with the suitcase, and a cloudy mist layered over the top. Simple but effective, I believe.

I could go on for pages about compositing but this is supposed to be a brief explanation. So, to help blend images, try the light screen overtop idea. I have used that with success more than once. It can be as simple as a picture of mist or sunlit rays made transparent and laid over the image. One thing you can do is just set the images on a textured background like a collage, as in the “Tea Time Trouble” cover above. Don’t try to make them fit together. Just include them, perhaps fading or shadowing, and present it as a sort of shadowbox or scrapbook page. Those can turn out quite well. Divide the cover into sections and include separating elements or make them framed by the title to aid the composition.

 civil war 25 middleastern military romance 25 unlikely romance 25

As you go along creating your final cover image, don’t forget that you need text. Author and title at a minimum, and possibly a tagline or subtitle. Those should, if possible, not cover your images, or, at least, not important parts of them.  Text placement can be great fun and should harmonize with the rest of your design.

armor inside out

This example of a cartoon-style cover uses multiple images, which were relatively easy to composite because these art-style images are usually vectors or .png files, which means they often don’t have a fixed background and can be resized any way you like. They look a bit like Colorforms and can be set in place without worrying as much about blending in. As long as you choose artwork of similar styles, hopefully by the same artist, you can do exciting things.

The capitals text on this cover is a free font, in a series called Kingsthings. This font designer makes charming, detailed fonts and offers them for free. I made the capitals larger, aligned them within the chain of the heart locket, and tucked everything together in a technique called “nesting.” Try not to get too many different fonts going on a single cover. Remember, we are concentrating on simple. I used the same font on the subtitle and the author name.

Mix up ornate fonts with simpler ones, straight with curly. Try different sizes, such as tall at the beginning and end of a title to create a sort of mirror effect. By the way, be very careful about getting free fonts. Font sites are common sources of viruses. Stick with a few reputable sites, like 1001 Free Fonts, Dafont, and FontSquirrel. Check carefully because not all the fonts on these sites are free. Some are pay, some are donation, some are other arrangements with the creator. One font creator asked that if I use his font I send him a copy of what I did with it.

I have hundreds of fonts, including a package from MyFonts that I downloaded for $20 with many classic fonts. If you can use 10 fonts out of a package like that it is worth buying, because fonts often cost $20 or more just for one set of one good design. Beware of free fonts that are missing punctuation or other elements. You can sometimes substitute from a complementary font and still get a good result. Some font packages also include “dings,” which are shapes that can be very useful. You can pretty up a title treatment with dings, vector objects, and even small images, as on the series covers below, the second cover being for a book I am currently working on. In the first, the Baron’s Ring is incorporated into the B in the title, and in the second, the “T” is formed by the sword. Swirly vectors add some flourish to the text. The similarity of the placement of the images and text styles and ornaments tie the series together. People can see at a glance that these two books go together.

     baron ebook 10 22 2015 25     the captain's blade 10 21 2015 25

When your cover is completed, (and please, save and make backups all along the way) save it as a project (In PhotoImpact that is a UFO format. In Photoshop it is a PSD. There are many options to save but those are two to help you keep projects straight.) This is critical if you need to come back and make changes later. The other file format, the one you will later upload to ebook publishers, is either a jpg or a png. The png format is a larger file size, but better quality. Also insert your ebook cover into your text file at the front. Many sites require this and remember, if you ever change your cover, you have to upload a new version of the text with the updated cover included, too.

Just for fun, I will close with a book I have yet to write, but I had a lot of fun designing the cover. It’s inspired by a character in Treasure Island. Look for the ideas I’ve discussed in this post: making the genre clear (hint: remember that humor is also a genre), making the images fit together or at least complement each other, text treatments, and anything else you notice. Please comment with your observations. Also, let me know what I missed in this post. Remember, I want to help.

blind pew not so 25

Though making excellent covers is not easy, it can be enjoyable. Don’t try to get too complicated as you learn. Remember clarity, simplicity, and lighting.

Leave a comment

Filed under cover design, Education, Humor, Publishing, Uncategorized, Writing, Reviewing, Publishing, and about Blogging

Will you be my Valentine? I mean Free Reader?

valentine-free-books

Whether you’re a Valentine’s Day lover or hater, we hope you’re a free book lover! There are lots to choose from, including nine from Findley Family Video Publications. Come pay a visit to our facebook event page and see all the free books! Some are free only certain days so be sure to check throughout the three day event!

http://bit.ly/2lEM6Ds

Or come straight to the Christian Women Writers’ website to see what’s there! Whoa! A free Kindle giveaway!

http://cwwriters.com/readers/valentines-day-event-plus-kindle-fire-giveaway/

win-a-kindle

 

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Publishing, Writing, Reviewing, Publishing, and about Blogging

What Is BookBub and Why Would You Care that We’re There?

new releases

BookBub is a site where people can find books — deals, sales, freebies — ebooks, specifically. Authors can place ads there and sometimes get a whole lot of sales. The ads can be expensive, but most people say they are worth it.

Recently, however, BookBub has introduced some free options for authors to get noticed. One is that we can now have an author profile, and have all our books listed on the site. I did that, and now you can find me, hubby, and Sophronia starting here: https://www.bookbub.com/authors/mary-c-findley

Here’s a screenshot of what part of my author page looks like.

bookbub screenshot

You can search for any author you want on BookBub, and if he/she has an author profile you can follow that author. The cool part is that you will receive notices when that author publishes a new book. This year Findley Family Video Publications has already put out more than one title per month including updates and revised/expanded editions — and we are hard at work getting more new releases ready!

So here’s the great news: If you follow me at my BookBub author profile, you’ll be notified of each new release. And since it’s BookBub, you can browse a ton of authors and find your favorite or new favorite books. Please follow me there so you can see all we have to offer and tap into the power of BookBub, too!

Please follow me at BookBub, and let me know if you find more authors to love there!

For my fellow authors, here’s a how-to link to BookBub author profiles if you’d like to get one too. There is an approval process to go through. http://insights.bookbub.com/introducing-bookbub-author-profiles/

 

 

 

 

3 Comments

Filed under Publishing, Uncategorized

From The Great Thirst Part Six — Eva takes Keith and Talia to meet her son Angel

anne on eva

“You’ve made your point,” Drew said to his wife.
“Obviously I haven’t,” Anne snapped. “She’s risking your two biggest assets in this mission on lunch with a drug cartel insider. Instead of being able to at least admit that, she tries to makes this about me!”
Drew looked from Eva to Anne and then risked a glance at Talia and Keith. “Your call,” he said to Keith.
“No. Really, it’s not his call. We need to get these two back to the camp, and then we need to move it,” Anne said, pointing at Keith and Talia.
“Angel!” Eva gasped. The others turned in the direction she was staring and saw a slight, heavily-tattooed Mexican boy walking toward them. His eyes widened as he took in the distraught look on his mother’s face and he started to backpedal.
“Stop!” Anne shouted. “We need to talk to you.”
Eva screamed something in Spanish.
“Eva, no!” Talia cried. “He’s not in danger. Why would you tell him that?”
Anne strode toward Angel. “Just calm down, kid. Your mother’s overreacting. We don’t mean you any harm.”
Angel spewed a flood of harsh-sounding Spanish and retreated farther. Anne sprinted after him.
“Stay down!” Drew shouted at Keith. Keith enfolded Talia against his chest and crouched over her as shots rang out. Eva shrieked and sobbed, fighting against one of Drew’s people as she tried to pull her behind cover. Drew and four of his men made a human wall around them and hustled them to the Rover. Drew sat beside Keith and Talia with his gun resting on his thigh.
“Where’s Eva?” Talia cried.
“Peg Talbot is taking her to a separate location,” Drew said through gritted teeth.
“What about Anne?” Keith asked.
“Anne and Angel exchanged shots,” Drew said. “I’m not sure what their status is. My people who stayed behind will clean up and report as soon as they can.”
“Clean up?” Talia repeated, a quiver in her voice.
“Look, you people can tell me all you want that everybody is a priority,” Drew exploded. “But my employees, and outsiders who never should have had access to you – they take their own risks. Don’t concern yourself about Anne. She did her job.”
Keith heard a crackle and he saw Talia start and touch her ear.
“Cleanup complete,” the voice said. “Two returning to base, two to backup location.”
“Give me those things,” Drew commanded, holding out his hand. Keith and Talia surrendered the earwigs. “That wasn’t for your ears.”
“That’s wrong,” Talia said shakily. “The count is one person short.”
“No, it’s not,” Drew said tersely. “Everyone who’s alive is on the move. We transport bodies, but we don’t count them.”

2 Comments

Filed under Excerpts from our Fiction Books

The Hittite Series — Post by Michael J. Findley

4 hitties

The book of Genesis, post-flood to the death of Joseph, is the ice age. Michael Oard has done extensive work demonstrating that there was a single ice age immediately after the flood lasting about seven hundred years. For an introduction to this concept, the book Frozen In Time is available without charge as a series of .pdf documents on the answersingenesis.com website.

We wrote detailed, documented works on the establishment of religion, secular humanism, science, the results of secular humanism as an establishment of religion, creation, the origin of evil, the flood and the ice age. Critics complained that is was too long, too difficult to read, too many sources. So I removed all of the documentation, repetition, and restatement for clarity. No explanations for unusual words, nothing but basic assertions. This book is only about sixty pages and is called Disestablish.

Disestablish 25

To some critics, it is still too difficult to read. So I wrote a series of novels about the Hittites. The first book begins just after the fall of the tower of Babel, and the Hittites cannot comprehend a foreign language. Abraham is a friend of Ephron. Sarah and Hagar are friends of Shelometh. Biblical events are woven into the story line.

The series shows a population explosion, rapid advances in technology, knowledge of world wide events, the ability to travel great distances, wars, the introduction of idolatry, the consequences of idolatry, and long life spans.

It describes tools, food, eating habits, clothing, travel, domestic animals, marriage customs, jewelery, slavery, trade, relationships between cities and cultures, money, hunting, and sailing.

One of the characters talks about his visit to Noah. Death is rare in the first three books. Death is part of warfare in the fourth book, but otherwise uncommon. Death is common in the fifth book, with most of the characters introduced in the first three books dying. Children are born to parents in the fifth book who were born in the fourth book.

There are complex relationships between brothers and sisters and empires. Slaves are as important as royalty. Kings make mistakes. Slaves save empires. Most of the characters are neither royalty nor slaves.

The setting is primarily Hattusha and Hebron. However, it ranges from the first cataract of the Nile, to Troy, to the Black Sea to the Tigris River, to Damascus. Building by stone is detailed, Life an a Phoenician ship is described, but most of the time they live either in a city or a tent.

The standard method of transportation was walking, though riding a camel or a horse was common. During the course of these stories, the wagon and chariot are invented, improved and used in warfare. Ships were common. Writing predates this series. However, at the beginning, writing was very difficult and almost unknown. By the end of the fifth book, reading is common, almost universal.

But the primary purpose was to make the stories interesting. Because, if no one reads them, they do not teach.

Final hittite series cover

Here is the link tot he Ephron the Hittite series on Amazon. http://www.amazon.com/Ephron-Hittite-5-Book-Series/dp/B016QAVDB2

Please let us know what you think of the video.

on.fb.me/1Lw4Ui7

Leave a comment

Filed under Education, Excerpts from our Fiction Books, History

Premade Cover Sale! — Guest post by Jen Gentry

2451015_orig

Some of the most talented cover designers I have the privilege to know have come together for a great cause. They have donated several glorious pre-made book covers to help create scholarship money to assist aspiring indie authors to attend the upcoming Christian Indie Authors Conference. This is an excellent opportunity for Indie Authors to score a professional book cover at a very good cost and help a fellow Indie Author at the same time.


The sale is going on right now and ends on July 4th. The organizer Samantha Fury says they will be adding new covers daily until the sale is over.


I personally have enjoyed just looking through the wonderful selection of interesting, breathtaking, and artistic works on display. Anyone who purchases will be working directly with the designer to personalize each piece.


If you are looking for a cover for your own next masterpiece be sure to check out this book cover extravaganza.  Here is the link for the facebook event. https://www.facebook.com/groups/1594999634107302/

To learn more about the #CIAN2015 Conference please visit their website here
www.christianindieauthors.com/cia-conference.html

Original post from: http://jengentrysbooks.weebly.com/gems-from-jen/book-covers-supporting-a-good-cause-for-indie-authors

site.  https://www.facebook.com/groups/1594999634107302/

To learn more about the #CIAN2015 Conference please visit their website here
www.christianindieauthors.com/cia-conference.html

Leave a comment

Filed under Publishing, Publishing, Reviewing, Writing