Tag Archives: persecution

Review of Beloved Daughter by Alana Terry

Beloved Daughter is on sale now for only 99 cents!

About the Book –

In a small North Korean village, a young girl struggles to survive. It is her father’s faith, not the famine of North Hamyong Province, that most threatens Chung-Cha’s well-being.
“The Beloved Daughter” follows Chung-Cha into one of the most notorious prison camps the contemporary free world has known. Her crime? Being the daughter of a Christian.
“The Beloved Daughter” is Alana Terry’s debut Christian novel and has won multiple awards, including the Women of Faith writing contest and the Book of the Month award from The Book Club Network.

My Review –

“I Want to Know More About Moses!”

Alana Terry presents such a gripping and realistic picture of life in North Korea. The mentality of the Korean prison system becomes chillingly clear. Overtones of George Orwell’s 1984 ripple through this book. The determination to break spirits, destroy loyalties and humanity, and snuff out hope is everywhere. But faith is really the only answer, the only hope, in this visionary work, no matter what goes wrong, no matter how flawed or pressured God’s servants may be. God will do His work and prepare His servants.

About Alana –

When Alana isn’t writing, it’s likely that she’s on the floor wrestling with her kids. Or playing outside with her kids. Or chauffeuring her kids. Or trying some random science experiment with her kids. But she’s probably not cooking or cleaning.

Alana is a homeschooling mother of three who loves to write, hates to cook, and enjoys reading a good book almost as much as she enjoys writing one.

Alana won the Women of Faith writing contest for “The Beloved Daughter,” her debut inspirational novel. “What, No Sushi?” is Alana’s first book in a chapter-book series for kids published by Do Life Right, Inc.

Image of Alana Terry

The Beloved Daughter has won awards from the Book Club Network and the Women of Faith writing contest. It is also currently one of the nominations for Book of the Year at bookfun.org.

The Beloved Daughter will be on sale for just $0.99 (regularly $3.99) from the amazon kindle store from December 26-30. As a special Christmas bonus, if you are one of the first three people to comment on this blog, you can win your own free kindle copy today! And if you’re feeling especially lucky, enter this giveaway for a $25 amazon gift card!

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Filed under Current Issues, Politics, Writing, Reviewing, Publishing, and about Blogging

The War on Christmas

nativity wood bkgrd

Christmas originated in the Roman Empire when Christians gathered together to worship Jesus during the feast of Saturnalia. Since most Christians were poor or slaves, when the pagan majority celebrated Saturnalia, Christians were given the freedom, for that one day, to do whatever they wanted. They had “the day off.”

So when their masters, neighbors and friends went to drunken orgies to worship their gods, Christians gathered in purity to worship the true God. For almost two thousand years, very little has changed. As Christians attempt to exalt the God of Heaven and turn every heart to Him, unbelievers use every possible excuse to hearts away from Him.

“The Christmas season” has become an endless string of time consuming and expensive distractions. The purpose of Christmas has become making children happy or pleasing family members or helping poor people or anything else to divert our attention and energies from pleasing the God of Heaven.

That does not mean that we should not help the poor, or spend time with family members, or make children happy. It means, as Jesus said, “these things you should do and not leave the others undone.”

So what is a Christian’s responsibility to Christmas, since it is not even a Christian holiday? First, exalt the Lord Jesus Christ. Second do all to the glory of God. Do not allow others, events, traditions or even job responsibilities drive or distract you. Third, do not look down on the decisions other people make.
Let your moderation be made known to all.

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Filed under Bible Teaching, Current Issues, Politics

You HAVE to Know What Happens To The Lemon Tree

The Lemon Tree

A Review of The Lemon Tree by Ilil Arbel

This book was a gift from the author but don’t wait until she offers you one! Buy it, get it, read it somehow. You have to know this family, the Wissotzkys. You have to get your frostbitten nose rubbed with snow and fat in Siberia. That’s how immediate and real Ida’s experiences are. You have to experience how a childhood disease, one my own brother had, can devastate and yet produce a symbol of hope that will cost you some tears.

The book has beautiful old snapshots and that’s how the child Ida captures life, even terrifying, degrading, hopeless moments, in her mental camera that fills your mind with her childish wonder. Clearly her strong, loving family made the journey from Russia to China to Egypt more than bearable.

Drink in their strength and share tea from their Samovar, both the old one and the new one. Ride a different kind of ship with Ida and see “coincidences” that to me, even as a Christian reader, affirm that God still loves and looks out for His people. And don’t forget, you have to know what happens to the Lemon Tree.

http://www.amazon.com/The-Lemon-Tree-Ilil-Arbel/dp/0595339824

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Review of the Huguenot Sword by Shawn Lamb

I am interested in church history, especially regarding Protestants, and as soon as I saw this book I wanted to read it. I got the Amazon Kindle version on a 99 cent Cyber Monday sale after a heads-up from the author on Goodreads. It deals mostly with young adult characters and includes a number of well-known historical figures. For those who don’t know, Huguenots were Protestants who tried to obtain the right to live as citizens and practice their faith in Catholic France but were severely persecuted, especially under Cardinal Richelieu.

Shawn Lamb has created a great study of how ordinary people look at and practice their beliefs, and how those beliefs affect their own lives and conduct, and their interactions with others. If you like the Three Musketeers, the Scarlet Pimpernell, and Zorro, you will like this story. Adventure, disguises, intrigues, court life, expectations of family, arranged marriage, and elements of romance and temptation all enter into the plot and storyline.

Three young men try to live by their motto, “For Friendship, for Faith, and for Freedom,” while aiding the Huguenot Resistance in France. Shawn Lamb provides plenty of swordfighting, pursuits and escapes, and, most importantly, insight into how young people view faith as they mature and make decisions about what they really believe and how it will shape their conduct.

Though I enjoyed the story and characters very much, I found the book contained some technical imperfections. The author was kind enough to share her process of writing and “vetting” a book and her many years of experience with different ways of bringing a book to print. She graciously promised to take my comments about the book into consideration in her future writing.

So, take it all together, the Huguenot Sword was an exciting, satisfying read, a tribute to faith and its struggles to grow, and an opportunity for me to learn firsthand something about how an author gets a book out of her head and into print, or into my Kindle, in this case.  I gave it four out of five stars on Goodreads and Amazon.

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Filed under Writing, Reviewing, Publishing, and about Blogging